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birthing with guinever on facebook February 20, 2010

Posted by guinever in : babies, birth, birth stories, birth story, doula, epidural, health, homebirth, homeschooling, kentucky, labor, midwifery, pregnancy , comments closed

birthing with guinever on Facebook

Birthing with Guinever is now on facebook. I’ll be posting the latest pregnancy related research, the best pregnancy blog posts from around the web and products that every pregnant woman should know about, breastfeeding info.

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sweet quiverful picture December 10, 2009

Posted by guinever in : babies, birth, birth stories, doula, family, homeschooling, pregnancy , comments closed

steph-and-kids-hands-on-the-belly

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top 9 books for children when baby is on the way December 9, 2009

Posted by guinever in : birth, breastfeeding, Christmas, family, homebirth, homeschooling, pregnancy , comments closed

Need to get a gift for a little person who is expecting a new sibling? Or maybe you need a book that is just simply delightful?  I’ve compiled a list of my favorite books where there is a new baby or baby is on the way. All have wonderful illustrations and tell a story. (Many books in this category read like a text book or a self-help book, or the pictures are boring or too cartoonish and just aren’t pretty.) All of these books are on our bookshelf (except for the last one that I need to order) and they’re worn out from reading them so much.  Enjoy!

Waiting for Baby by Harriet Ziefert and illustrated by Emily Bolam. I love the center of this book because the pages are flaps, so you can see what Max did each day, all in a row. As you turn each flap, the pages get bigger. This is a great design for a book. My favorite is what Max did on Wednesday. He banged on his drum and marched around and chanted:

Rum, tum, tum ba-by come! Rum, tum tum ba-by come! Rum-a-tee, Rum-a-tee, Rum-a-tee-tum!

We have read this over and over at the end of my pregnancies and my kids have marched around just like Max and shouted at my tummy for baby to come out.

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baby-come-outBaby, Come Out! by Fran Manushkin and illustrated by Ronald Himler. This is a sweet book with delightful drawings that tells the story of how baby doesn’t want to come out because she likes it just where she is, all safe and warm in her Mama. Each family member has his or own way of trying to coax baby to be born. Finally, baby comes out when her daddy gives everyone a kiss. She wants a kiss too. I especially like the drawings in this because it shows baby in Mama’s tummy. I think it helps young children visualize that there really is a baby in there!

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In just Just Like a Baby
, by Rebecca Bond, Father makes a cradle and then the other family members all add something to the cradle–Grandfather painted it, Grandmother sewed a quilt, brother made a mobile. Finally, mother pushed the cradle to the window and felt it was ready for baby:

There next to the windows, Mother rocked the cradle gently back and forth
She ran her fingers over the smooth, sanded wood…
She turned down the warm quilt
She watched the mobile slowly turn…
And she felt the baby move inside her.

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On Mother’s Lap, by Ann Herbert Scott and illustrated by Glo Coalson. Mom reads Michael a story who brings more and more things on his mother’s lap as they sit together in the rocking chair. Eventually, his baby sister wakes up, and when Mom goes to get the baby, Michael is upset because he doesn’t think there’s enough room. But of course there is always more room on mother’s lap.

I love reading this book with the kids, rocking back and forth, back and forth–just like in the book.

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we-like-to-nurseWe Like to Nurse, by Chia Martin and illustrated by Shukyo Rainey is a book that is especially good for toddlers and preschoolers because of the brightly painted pictures and simple text. Each page shows a different animal nursing its young. The last page with a mother nursing her baby, reads, “We like to nurse.”

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biggest-bedThe Biggest Bed in the World, by Lyndsey Camp, and illustrated by Jonathon Langley. This is such a fun book. When there’s a baby in his bed, dad says, “How am I supposed to sleep like this?” The family keeps on growing with the addition of twins and triplets until Dad finally has to make the biggest bed in the world. He even has to knock down walls so the bed will fit in the house. When the kids all move to their own beds, Dad thinks his bed is too empty, and still he wonders, “How am I supposed to sleep like this?” I love the way nursing is drawn in this story.

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welcome-with-loveWelcome With Love, by Jenni Overend and illustrated by Julie Vivas. I love this book! This is the perfect book to help prepare children who might be attending the birth because it shows the mom in several different labor positions with her husband. The midwife and other children are in the illustrations as well. This is a little different than other children’s book because it actually shows the birth. Don’t worry. There’s no blood and gore and raunchy shots, but it beautifully depicts what homebirth is all about. Mom gives birth standing up, leaning on her husband. You see baby’s head coming out from her. Next, the mom is kneeling, scooping her baby up to her with the cord still attached. My favorite drawing is the scene after the birth from overhead which shows the dad holding the placenta in the bowl; he had just cut the cord. Baby is tucked in bed beside mom, surrounded by the three other children. My favorite quote:

A little boy, Mum says, crying and smiling at the same time. She holds him close against her breast. Dad tucks the blanket around them. He’s crying too.

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berenstainThe Berenstain Bears’ New Baby, by Stan and Jan Berenstain. Cute little book. Brother bear has outgrown his bed so he and Dad go out into the woods to build a new one. When they get home, there’s a new baby sister in brother’s old bed.

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Dancing Waters, by Tara Tulley and illustrated by KC Clark “tenderly tells the story of a family who chooses a doula and waterbirth in a hospital setting” Also available by the same author and illustrator is Stars of the Sky where a mother tells her twins about their homebirth.

Dale, a childbirth educator, says,

It looks like it’s a feast for the eyes as well as the heart and soul.

I have not seen these books for myself, but they look delightful. You can find them here.

If you know of another book that might fit my list, please let me know by leaving a comment.

Go to my list of recommended pregnancy books.

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excellent blog awards February 1, 2008

Posted by guinever in : birth, doula, homeschooling , comments closed

excellentblog.jpgIt seems that the excellent blog award is making its rounds through all the birthing blogs because I received the award twice last weekend from a couple educators at Independent Childbirth. Thanks, Nicole for granting me this award “for the Best Menu Bar and Side Bar.” She says “I have loads of easy to find, user-friendly information on her blog. And it doesn’t look messy!”

Thanks, Sheridan, for saying that “I have wonderful supportive posts on all topics, from first foods to positive birth stories. Ask her questions and she will give you thoughtful inspirational answers.”

In order to accept this award, I must pass it along to at least 10 other blogs. I’ve decided to give a few to pregnancy related sites, but I’m also branching out a little bit. Here are my picks:

  1. I’m sending this award over to joyful chaos for her step-by-step front wrap baby carrier tutorial in pictures. I love reading her varied blog about parenting and homeschooling.
  2. to the Mother Tongue for being a funny, sometimes outrageous mothering blog. Here’s the straight dirt on cloth diapering and read about her gameshow debut.
  3. to Belly Tales, the diary of a midwife (used to be the diary of a student midwife). Here are a few videos she posted of Angelina the Midwife.
  4. to Well Preserved for being a nice birth blog with an emphasis on VBAC with a local flair. Here’s a post about births on TV.
  5. to the new Independent Childbirth blog for being a diverse group of birth junkies.
  6. to Mountain Shade, for her breathtaking photographs of Alaska. See the photos of dall sheep and rainbows.
  7. to Tea Time with Liz for having the best ever photograph of brownies and milk.
  8. to the Thinking Mother for being, well, a thinking mother. Her posts are thoroughly researched. Read all about cacoa and her homemade hot cocoa recipe.
  9. to a Fresh Start for gracefully moving through her life after the death of her husband…read about what would have been her 19th anniversary.
  10. and last but not least, to dooalot for posting crazy pictures from the 1970’s of when she was a kid.
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starting baby on solids foods: how to know when and what to feed December 14, 2007

Posted by guinever in : babies, breastfeeding, homeschooling , comments closed

126026933v15_240x240_front_color-white.jpgDon’t you just love this onesie? When I took one of my babies to the pediatrician for his 6 month check-up, the conversation went something like this:

Pediatrician: So have you started giving your baby solid food yet?

Thinking mother: No, not yet.

Pediatrician: Well, when are you going to start?

Me: When my milk isn’t meeting his needs anymore.

Pediatrician: Well, when do you think that’s going to be? …a good time to start is when your baby is around 6 months old.

Me: I really don’t know at this point. It could be next week or maybe not for a few months. He’s pretty healthy, isn’t he? I mean look at those thighs. My milk is all he needs right now.

Pediatrician: hmm. (laughing), I guess you’re right. He is a little chunk. And he’s healthy (looking at the medical chart), you haven’t brought him in for any sick visits.

Tips on knowing when to start your baby on solid food:

baby’s first perfect foods

what the pediatricians say

* Pediatricians and parents should be aware that exclusive breastfeeding is sufficient to support optimal growth and development for approximately the first 6 months of life and provides continuing protection against diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. Breastfeeding should be continued for at least the first year of life and beyond for as long as mutually desired by mother and child.

* Complementary foods rich in iron should be introduced gradually beginning around 6 months of age. Unique needs or feeding behaviors of individual infants may indicate a need for introduction of complementary foods as early as 4 months of age, whereas other infants may not be ready to accept other foods until approximately 8 months of age.

* Introduction of complementary feedings before 6 months of age generally does not increase total caloric intake or rate of growth and only substitutes foods that lack the protective components of human milk.

* During the first 6 months of age, even in hot climates, water and juice are unnecessary for breastfed infants and may introduce contaminants or allergens.

* Increased duration of breastfeeding confers significant health and developmental benefits for the child and the mother, especially in delaying return of fertility (thereby promoting optimal intervals between births). * There is no upper limit to the duration of breastfeeding and no evidence of psychologic or developmental harm from breastfeeding into the third year of life or longer.

Excerpts from the American Academy of Pediatrics’ policy statement on Breastfeeding and use of human milk section 10.

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